Posts tagged ‘Seb Drummond’

December 14th, 2012

If the Cap Fits

A protest over new rules means the headmistress has to re-establish discipline

By Seb Drummond

Monday September 27th 1965

Jane Morton, form tutor for the Upper Sixth Science pupils at Castlethwaite High School for Girls, was sitting in the staff room with Rachel Green, who held the same position for the Sixth Form Humanities students. They had a few minutes before their afternoon duties began. The two teachers were firm friends and often exchanged confidences.

“I hear the natives are getting restless,” said Jane.

“You can say that again. I’ve never known so much ill-feeling about a school policy.”

“It keeps being brought up and all we can say is that the Head has made her decision so it has to be accepted. Everyone just has to get on with it.”
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December 14th, 2012

A Historical Escapade

A relationship between a boy and a girl from neighbouring schools causes all manner of problems.

By Seb Drummond

Castlethwaite Grammar School for Boys – Thursday morning, October 27th 1960.

Stephen Anderson had been told that the Headmaster wanted to see him in his study immediately. He had been expecting the summons and as a result he was missing the end of a Latin period with one of the school’s two specialist Latin teachers.

After what had happened the previous day he had wanted to avoid one master in particular but it was not to be. He had expected a severe dressing down, but found himself more upset by the clear disappointment in the teacher’s demeanour. Stephen acknowledged to himself that in the cool light of a new day he did feel ashamed and genuinely remorseful. The instruction to report to the Headmaster’s study had almost come as a relief, although he was hardly looking forward to it. It also brought the Latin lesson to an end as he was the only pupil. Stephen was the only Upper Sixth former taking Latin at A-level. Even in this year, 1960, Latin had lost most of its popularity as a subject for advanced study, and it was only the strongly held view of the Headmaster who thought Latin the most civilised of subjects, that permitted a course with a single pupil to be sanctioned.
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